Excerpt & Giveaway: The Longbourn Letters by Rose Servitova

A Jane Austen fan fiction (JAFF) book with letters exchanged between two characters.

Diary of an Eccentric

Today marks the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, and to celebrate her life and her novels, my guest today is Rose Servitova, with an excerpt from The Longbourn Letters: The Correspondence Between Mr. Collins & Mr. Bennet.

Please give her a warm welcome:

I love minor characters and believe they add so much to novels. What I loved about writing this book, is the licence it gave me to allow Austen’s brilliant characters such as Lady Catherine and Anne de Bourgh, Mary Bennet and Mrs Philips as well as Mr Bennet and Mr Collins more ‘air-time’ to develop and become more tangible. It also enabled me to introduce new, comical minor characters such as the charismatic Reverend Smellie, the eccentric inventor Mr Lucas, the carriage-driving Baroness Herbert and Reverend Green (who walks an invisible dog).

This excerpt is taken from the second chapter of The Longbourn Letters –…

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Excerpt & Giveaway: The Longbourn Letters by Rose Servitova

A Jane Austen fan fiction (JAFF) book with letters exchanged between two characters.

Diary of an Eccentric

Today marks the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen’s death, and to celebrate her life and her novels, my guest today is Rose Servitova, with an excerpt from The Longbourn Letters: The Correspondence Between Mr. Collins & Mr. Bennet.

Please give her a warm welcome:

I love minor characters and believe they add so much to novels. What I loved about writing this book, is the licence it gave me to allow Austen’s brilliant characters such as Lady Catherine and Anne de Bourgh, Mary Bennet and Mrs Philips as well as Mr Bennet and Mr Collins more ‘air-time’ to develop and become more tangible. It also enabled me to introduce new, comical minor characters such as the charismatic Reverend Smellie, the eccentric inventor Mr Lucas, the carriage-driving Baroness Herbert and Reverend Green (who walks an invisible dog).

This excerpt is taken from the second chapter of The Longbourn Letters –…

View original post 1,686 more words

An Interview with Cassandra Grafton & Giveaway

Source: An Interview with Cassandra Grafton & Giveaway

Brock Turner is a Rapist and Deserves More Than Six Months in Jail. And More Importantly To The Rape Survivor, The Warrior, We Stand With You

A terrific response to the Stanford rape case by a good friend of mine. She really got it right.

jambiethoughts

Brock Turner raped an unconscious woman behind a dumpster. He was stopped by two witnesses on bicycles. Brock stopped what he was doing when they saw him, thus in my opinion and seriously it’s just common sense, signifying that he knew he was doing something wrong.  Then he  ran away. The witnesses chased after him and held him for the police. One witness  was crying and vomiting due to what he saw.

This must have been a truly horrific scene  for a person to have this reaction, to cry and vomit.  Now think about the way that Brock has described what happened that night.   He said he drank too much.

The Judge stated in writing  he was sentencing Brock to six months in jail, not prison,  because he took responsibility for his actions and showed remorse. Really? I think I missed it. I think we all did.

When did that happen? When did Brock show remorse? …

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Are the Republicans punking us? Or Republicans, the bad ones, grow the hell up.

A great commentary on just a few of the crazy stuff that’s in the news today. Must be a full moon, or Flint’s water is reaching us all.

jambiethoughts

I’m just going to start off by writing down the headlines of articles I’ve seen on Facebook today, and then maybe add some sarcastic comments. Then  I’ll try not to swear to much. That’s the plan.

Glenn Beck said that God had to kill Antonio Scalia to help put Ted Cruz in the White House.

An Idaho Senate panel  just approved a Bill to use the Bible to teach biology.

South Dakota approves transgender bathroom bill.

So seriously, what is happening in the world today? I realize it’s basically as messed up as it was yesterday and the day before, but I just have to say something. Are we , the American people being punked by the Republican party?  Because if all of the above headlines are not a joke, they should be.

I’m addressing the people who are in the news, specifically in the above headlines now……What the hell is…

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Japanese town’s Cat Street View lets you virtually tour its backstreets, meet feline residents

Something new for cat lovers.

SoraNews24

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It’s an amazing age we live in, where you can fire up Google Street View and virtually walk the boulevards of many of the world’s cities. But it turns out Google Street View has a bit of a rival in Japan. Granted, its scope is far smaller than Google’s, given that it only covers part of one town, but it shows up the Internet giant by letting you wander its walkways from the perspective of an alley cat, and even provides profiles of all the neighborhood kitties you’ll meet along the way!

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What Teacher’s Lounge? Some information for Governor Kasich

What Teacher’s Lounge? Some information for Governor Kasich.

Death in Kashmir by M. M. Kaye

A book from my youth – one of six romantic suspense stories set in exotic locales by MMKaye.

She Reads Novels

Death in Kashmir I have always thought of M. M. Kaye as an author of historical novels (such as the wonderful Far Pavilions) and although I was vaguely aware that she had also written a series of mystery novels, I had never really thought about reading them. Now that I’ve read the first one, Death in Kashmir, I will certainly be reading the others. What a great book this is!

Death in Kashmir was first published in 1953, but set a few years earlier in 1947, just as India is about to gain independence from Britain. Our heroine, Sarah Parrish, is attending what will probably be the final meeting of the Ski Club of India at Gulmarg, a resort in the mountains of Kashmir. Sarah is hoping for an enjoyable, relaxing holiday but the first sign of trouble ahead comes when another skier has a fatal accident on the slopes. Another…

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The Machine

Great review by SF author Daev hutichinson (Europe in Autumn)

The Automatic Cat

The Machine arrives one day at Beth’s flat on the Isle of Wight, the way many things are delivered to us these days. It comes in several pieces, brought by delivery men, and some bits are so big that they have to take the windows off to get them into the flat. It’s a hot day.

James Smythe’s extraordinary novel begins with a scene of domestic banality. The Machine could be a new bed, or a flatpack wardrobe. But it’s not. The Machine is illegal. It’s a device meant to erase traumatic memories and help rebuild people like Beth’s husband, Vic, a soldier who returned physically and emotionally wounded from a foreign war. Hailed as a miracle cure, the first generation of Machines was outlawed when it became clear that they were in fact doing more harm than good. Vic himself is in a clinic in London, in a vegetative…

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Blog Tour – Anika Arrington’s The Accidental Apprentice

Anika Arrington’s the accidental apprentice
The Accidental Apprentice by Anika Arrington


interview with anika arrington

Tell us a little about yourself and your background? I moved to Arizona when I was 4, and I’ve been here ever since. I’m married to the best guy ever! I just gave birth to my sixth child, and he is just scrumptious. I’m a huge believer in self-education and life long learning, so I read all kinds of non-fiction as well as fiction. I studied at Northern Arizona University for three years: political science, communications, and creative writing. Obviously only one of those really stuck.

When did you decide to become a writer? Decide is such a solid, formal word. I guess I decided not to give up on writing about five years ago. I had started writing stories and given up on them a hundred times before, but I was just in a place in my life where I felt I could really make something happen, and I did.

What are your ambitions for your writing career? Well, at the end of it I would like to look back and be able to say, “I never wrote anything that was untrue to myself.” Beyond that, I just want to keep writing, keep putting books and stories out there, and improving as a writer and a person.

Which writers inspire you? Classical favorites include Dickens, C.S. Lewis, Shakespeare, Edgar Allen Poe, and Oscar Wilde. In a more modern context I love Erin Morgentstern, particularly her Flax Golden Tales on her website. Patrick Ruthfuss is another modern favorite. And I find that a good number of children’s writers really resonate with me: Dr. Suess, Avi, Brandon Mull, Shannon Hale, and Tomie de Paola to name a few.

What are you working on at the minute? Raising my babies. I just had my sixth kiddo in August, and he needs a lot of loving on. So with the release of The Accidental Apprentice I am taking a little break while ideas for the sequel simmer, and then I will jump back in come January. And I am never not working on being a better writer, so while I am taking a break from having a WIP I will do a bunch of reading up on writing and practice and play with older manuscripts like forgotten toys.

Have you written any other novels in collaboration with other writers? Well, I did have a short story published in an anthology, so it was great seeing the group effort behind the scenes, but I’m not sure I have the right temperament for collaboration. It would have to be with someone whose style was either completely different than mine, or who was so in sync with me that they could pretty much write the book themselves.

Do you write every day, 5 days a week or as and when? I wish I wrote every day. i want to. Some weeks I can, others I can’t. I have found that the real change in the way I write in the last year or two is that I don’t wait to feel like writing. I do it when I hate it, when I’m too tired, too stressed, too whatever. And in the end, that’s what it takes to get the work done.

Where do the your ideas come from? A small local honey stand in Pine, AZ.

Do you work to an outline or plot or do you prefer just see where an idea takes you? I love writing by the seat of my pants and seeing what happens. But I was forced with Accidental Apprentice to create an outline. And I didn’t always stick to it, but it was really helpful when I got stuck from time to time.

Do you read much and if so who are your favorite authors? Writers who don’t read confuse me. But that aside, this year has had me in a bit of a dry spell. I am usually a voracious reader, but between my pregnancy, my other kids, and writing my own book my To-Read list has grown rather than shrunk. Though Patrick Ruthfuss’s “The Name of the Wind” and “The Wise Man’s Fear” were so stinking good I wanted to give up writing and become a professional Patrick fan. I actually don’t tend to latch on to a particular author, but rather individual books that speaks to me. Garth Nix’s “Abhorsen” series was truly excellent, his “Mister Monday” didn’t really do much for me. And that’s ok. That’s the nature of art.

What book/s are you reading at present? “The Circle Maker” by Mark Batterson and “Leaders Eat Last” by Simon Senick

Tell us about the cover/s and how it/they came about. Well, I didn’t have much to do with the cover. The amazing Dale Robert Pease read the descriptions I gave him and then went to work, occasionally asking a few questions. The result is one of my favorite scenes from the book brought to life. I’m really happy with it.

What is your favourite positive saying? Really? I’m a great big cynic most of the time, and yet surprisingly optimistic. I find happy little phrases on the trite side. Just doing my best and being alternatively content and joyful (while making fun of the cheerleaders of the world) as often as possible is enough for me.

What is your favourite book and why? Why do people think that any writer could pick one favorite book? Every book is its own work of art, and thus different. We like different books for different reasons and seasons. I reread Dicken’s “A Christmas Carol” every year at Christmas time, but that’s not my favorite. I can recite “Green Eggs and Ham” from memory, but it’s not my favorite. My favorite is whatever suits the mood and the moment. Right now, I would probably say Shakespeare’s “Much Ado about Nothing.”

What is your favourite quote? The word “quote” is a verb. A quotation however, is a noun, and I might have a favorite one of those. “The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” Socrates

What advice would you give to your younger self? You’re a writer, stupid. Just go with it. And YOLO is not a justification for anything!

What advice would you give to aspiring writers? Be observant. Ideas are everywhere. Write them all down. Play with writing. Do it constantly and faithfully and don’t stop. Also have a day job. Try a bunch of different things to give you the life experiences that will feed your creative endeavors later on.

Is there anything else you would like to add that I haven’t included? Never try to write up interview questions at night when you are exhausted and the caffeine has worn off.


About The Accidental Apprentice

The Accidental Apprentice by Anika Arrington


An Excerpt from The Accidental Apprentice

The Accidental Apprentice by Anika Arrington


 About Anika

The Accidental Apprentice by Anika Arrington

Find Arrington on the web: Website | Facebook | Twitter | Amazon | Goodreads


 Where to Buy

The Accidental Apprentice by Anika Arrington


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